What we treat

We can provide Individual Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Group therapy and family support for children and adults who need support with the following mental health, behaviour or developmental difficulties:

Depression is more than simply feeling unhappy or fed up for a few days. Most people go through periods of feeling down, but when you’re depressed you feel persistently sad for weeks or months, rather than just a few days. Some people think depression is trivial and not a genuine health condition. They’re wrong – it is a real illness with real symptoms. Depression is not a sign of weakness or something you can “snap out of” by “pulling yourself together”.

The good news is that with the right treatment and support, most people with depression can make a full recovery. (NHS)

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Anxiety is a feeling of unease, such as worry or fear, that can be mild or severe. Everyone has feelings of anxiety at some point in their life. For example, you may feel worried and anxious about sitting an exam, or having a medical test or job interview.

During times like these, feeling anxious can be perfectly normal. But some people find it hard to control their worries. Their feelings of anxiety are more constant and can often affect their daily lives.

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Most people feel anxious or scared sometimes, but if it’s affecting your life to the extent that it is limiting your activities, hobbies, interests or impacting on day to day functioning, then seek support or advice.  

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Health Anxiety (sometimes called hypochondria) is when you spend so much time worrying, you’re ill, or about getting ill, that it starts to take over your life. (NHS)

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Social anxiety disorder, also called social phobia, is a long-term and overwhelming fear of social situations. It’s a common problem that usually starts during the teenage years. It can be very distressing and have a big impact on your life.

For some people it gets better as they get older. But for many people it does not go away on its own without treatment.  It’s important to get help if you are having symptoms. Therapy can help you manage it. (NHS)

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A phobia is an overwhelming and debilitating fear of an object, place, situation, feeling or animal. Phobias are more pronounced than fears. They develop when a person has an exaggerated or unrealistic sense of danger about a situation or object.

If a phobia becomes very severe, a person may organise their life around avoiding the thing that’s causing them anxiety. As well as restricting their day-to-day life, it can also cause a lot of distress.

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Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common mental health condition where a person has obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviours.

OCD can affect men, women and children. Some people start having symptoms early, often around puberty, but it usually starts during early adulthood.

OCD can be distressing and significantly interfere with your life, but treatment can help you keep it under control.

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Most people feel stressed and some people find stress helpful or even motivating.  But if stress is affecting your life in a negative way it can be helpful to consider different ways of managing or coping with your stress.

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It’s normal for children to feel worried or anxious from time to time – such as when they’re starting school or nursery, or moving to a new area. But for some children, anxiety affects their behaviour and thoughts every day, interfering with their school, home and social life. This is when you may need professional help to tackle it. (NHS)

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Anger is a normal and useful emotion. It can tell children when things are not fair or right. But anger can become a problem if a child’s angry behaviour becomes out of control or aggressive.

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It can be difficult for parents to tell whether their teenagers are just “being teens” or if there is something more serious going on. Many of the things you may notice, such as changing moods, can often be attributed to normal teenage behaviour. However, it can be helpful to know when there may be signs of a more serious problem.

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Depression does not only affect adults. Children and young people can get depressed too. It’s important to get help early if you think your child may be depressed. The longer it goes on, the more likely it is to disrupt your child’s life and turn into a long-term problem. (NHS)

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See the NICE guidelines on depression in children and young people.

At such an important development stage, it’s important that teens learn how to communicate well and express anger in a healthy way.  If you child is struggling to manage or communicate anger effectively and it’s affecting their behaviour and relationships negatively it can help to get advice and support.

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An eating disorder is when you have an unhealthy attitude to food, which can take over your life and make you ill.  It can involve eating too much or too little, or becoming obsessed with your weight and body shape. But there are treatments that can help and you can recover from an eating disorder.

Men and women of any age can get an eating disorder, but they most commonly affect young women aged 13 to 17 years old.

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Binge eating disorder involves regularly eating large portions of food all at once until you feel uncomfortably full, and then often upset or guilty. Binges are often planned in advance and the person may buy “special” binge foods. Men and women of any age can get binge eating disorder, but it typically starts in the late teens or early 20s.

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Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a disorder of mood and how a person interacts with others. It’s the most commonly recognised personality disorder. In general, someone with a personality disorder will differ significantly from an average person in terms of how he or she thinks, perceives, feels or relates to others.

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Emotion regulation is a fairly complex combination of ways in which a person relates to and acts on emotional experiences. This includes the ability to: 

  • Behave appropriately when distressed
  • Understand and accept emotional experiences
  • Use healthy strategies to manage uncomfortable emotions

People with good emotion regulation skills are able to control the urges to engage in impulsive behaviours, such as self-harm, reckless behaviour, or physical aggression during times of emotional stress, whereas people who are emotionally dysregulated find this difficult. They may also experience extreme fear of rejection or abandonment, feelings of emptiness, paranoia or anger.

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Developmental Trauma is a term used to describe childhood trauma such as chronic abuse, neglect or other harsh adversity in their own homes.  Such trauma can affect a child’s development, mental and physical health, relationships and education.  The impact of developmental trauma can stay with someone throughout the lifespan.

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Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a condition that affects people’s behaviour. People with ADHD can seem restless, may have trouble concentrating and may act on impulse.

Symptoms of ADHD tend to be noticed at an early age and may become more noticeable when a child’s circumstances change, such as when they start school. Most cases are diagnosed when children are 6 to 12 years old. The symptoms of ADHD usually improve with age, but many adults who were diagnosed with the condition at a young age continue to experience problems.

People with ADHD may also have additional problems, such as sleep and anxiety disorders.

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Those with Autism can be at increased risk of anxiety, depression and other mental health difficulties.  They may also find relationships particularly challenging or struggle with social rules that help to maintain relationships.

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